Are Computers Changing Us or Are They Just Another Tool?

computers_wide-2c506f3892224e70baeaac4e44f59f8cac3fe753-s1300-c85 Sometimes I dream about starting a small group or worshiping community built around listening to podcasts and discussing them together. There are so many provocative ones that are secular, yet lend themselves to spiritual and ethical reflection: The Truth, Radiolab, New Tech City (which I've written about recently), and even certain segments of Pop Culture Happy Hour.

The latest is Invisibilia, which sadly has finished its season. But that gives you plenty of time to get caught up if you've missed it. The latest episode, Our Computers, Ourselves, was outstanding and great fodder for Spirituality in the Smartphone Age---both the book and the workshop. If you take a multi-day class with me on this topic you WILL listen to excerpts of this podcast!

The first segment follows Thad Starner, a professor at Georgia Tech who's been wearing a computer for decades now. It's like a home-grown Google Glass that helps him record what he's doing, call up thoughtful details about people he's talking to ("how's your daughter adjusting to college?"), and much more. Thad sees his wearable computer as no different than eyeglasses---a tool that helps him make his way in the world. He sees no downside. Is he right? Does this strike some people as creepy just because it's so new? Or is a computer that integrates with us so seamlessly---that helps us think, and on some level thinks itself---somehow different than an inert thing like a pair of spectacles? And is a smartphone really that different from a wearable computer?

The second segment is about a man who started a Twitter account to publish pictures of boorish behavior on the New York subway. At first, the affirmation he received for posting the pictures provided validation and helped him let go of his indignation. Then he began to crave the attention and got snarkier and snarkier... until the N train fought back. A great reflection about the psychology of Internet venting. (Spoiler alert: it doesn't help you let the bad feelings go. Quite the opposite.)

Check out Our Computers, Ourselves on Invisibilia. And tell me what you think.

Image is from the Invisibilia website.