Friday Link Love

A few fun/interesting things from the last few weeks: Social Networking in Its Oldest Form -- BBC (video)

A man in Canada has released several thousand bottles into the ocean, and received thousand of responses from all over the world.

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Women Own 1% of the World's Property: Occupy That -- Huffington

Maybe it's because girls and women:

  • Don't get to go to school when their brothers do
  • Get married off (don't worry, at a good price)
  • Are deprived of food when it's scarce
  • Aren't allowed to own anything themselves
  • Don't inherit
  • Aren't paid for their labor
  • Are property. Duh.

I'm reading Ashley Judd's biography right now (really, it's good) and through her advocacy work she has met women all over the world who are subjected to sexual slavery and engaged in prostitution because there are not other viable options. The stories will make your skin crawl, yet she somehow manages to see hope.

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Generation Gap: How Age Shapes Political Outlook -- NPR/Pew

Interesting stats; I'll let them speak for themselves.

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The Way We Teach Math and Language is All Wrong -- Freakonomics Blog

If we learned our first language like we usually learn second languages, it might look like this. A young child says, “I am hungry.” The parent replies, “Wait! Before saying am, you first must learn to conjugate to be in all persons and number, in the indicative, imperative, and subjunctive moods, and in the past, perfect, and future tenses.” After a few months, or maybe weeks, of this teaching, the child would conclude that it has no aptitude for languages and become mute. And human culture would perish in a generation.

If we taught math or science like we normally teach languages…oh, wait, we do! (And I believe, although with less direct knowledge, that we teach most subjects this way.)

Caroline has had a harder time with math this year, not because she doesn't understand the concepts, but because of the wording of some of the questions, and perhaps, the way it's being taught. We've been playing with the Kahn Academy videos.

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What is God? -- Andrew Sullivan

My heresy - and I concede it - is in rejecting the traditional view of the atonement issue. For me, Jesus's death was not the downpayment on our salvation. He was the way, the truth and the life. His horrifying crucifixion was not some unique necessary sacrifice. It was a commonplace punishment in his time. What singled him out was the manner of his death, his refusal to stop it, his calm in embracing it, his forgiveness even of those who nailed him there, with that astonishing sentence, "Father, forgive them. For they know not what they do."

I don't read that as an affronted "they don't know they are executing the Godhead himself". I read it as "they are so consumed with fear and the world and violence and power that they require forgiveness and mercy, not condemnation". It is this very composure, this sadness born of indescribable empathy, this inner calm and stillness, that convinces me of Jesus' saturation with the Godhead. He was not the human equivalent of an animal sacrifice; he was the light of the world, showing us by his example how we can be happy and at peace and in love with one another and God itself.

That.

Lots more there.