How Not to Have a Gut-Busting Holiday... I Think

Two things:

1. I've been trying to maintain a weight loss for the last six months.

2. I adore holiday food.

I am a moderator, not an abstainer. Some people need to swear off sugar/meat/gluten in order to be healthy. That's not my path; I just try to eat less. In the next month, there will be pralines made from my mother's recipe. Coffee cake from the Cafe Beaujolais cookbook. Gingerbread cookies from Cooks Illustrated. Etc. So what's a weight-conscious gal to do at Thanksgiving and Christmas?

I may have stumbled upon a bit of wisdom this weekend, and it was thanks to a tardy pecan pie.

Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays, but it's tough. I love the side dishes, and I want to sample everything. But I hate that "I'm gonna pop" feeling. Besides, it doesn't feel very mindful or grateful to eat the way I often have on Thanksgiving. (I know others who love the sense of overindulgence, of throwing moderation to the winds. Eh. Your mileage may vary.)

We were hosting friends with little kids on Thursday, so we didn't get fancy with the feast. Turkey, gravy, mashed potatoes, roasted brussels sprouts, storebought rolls, pumpkin pie. Fruit salad and cheese and crackers for the little ones. That's a banquet by most of the world's standards, but it's a pretty low-key Thanksgiving meal for us.

And I'll admit it: I missed the sweet potatoes. And the dressing. And some kind---any kind!---of casserole.

Meanwhile, I'd found out on Wednesday that the pecan pie my brother was sending me from Texas (I won a bet) wouldn't arrive until Friday. I pouted for a few moments, then realized it gave me a perfect excuse to make one of those beloved side dishes I'd been missing. So on Friday I made a sweet potato dish, which we ate with our leftovers... and pecan pie for dessert, of course.

The success of Thanksgiving Part II made me wonder how long I could keep Thanksgiving going. I love a good squash casserole, so we roasted two acorn squash over the weekend which I will use to make this offbeat carbarrific beauty.

So here's what I'm wondering. Instead of blowing the wad on a single gut-busting meal, why not make the feast last for a few days? Why not celebrate that thing you love to eat by making it the centerpiece of the meal?

That way each dish can be truly savored and enjoyed on its own terms, not relegated to a teeny corner of your plate. Remember, one of my approaches to weight maintenance is to "make friends with food."

Now, will this approach keep the pounds off? Who knows? I just think it's more satisfying (and I suspect, maybe healthier?) than a day of binging followed by several days of guilt and austerity.

So far so good with the bathroom scale. I sure felt better on Thursday evening. And I've had a ball each day since then, wondering "What can I make today to keep Thanksgiving going?" That's a spiritual question in addition to a culinary one.

Would love to hear your tips for getting through the holidays without digging out your fat pants...