My Friends Make Stuff

Two new books written by friends! Yippee! First:

blessed_final_one_400Sarah Griffith Lund's book Blessed Are the Crazy: Breaking the Silence about Mental Illness, Family and Church will be released by Chalice Press (publisher of Sabbath in the Suburbs) on September 8.  Description:

When do you learn that “normal” doesn’t include lots of yelling, lots of sleep, lots of beating? In Blessed Are the Crazy: Breaking the Silence about Mental Illness, Family, and Church, Sarah Griffith Lund looks back at her father’s battle with bipolar disorder, and the helpless sense of déjà vu as her brother and cousin endure mental illness as well. With a small group study guide and “Ten Steps for Developing a Mental Health Ministry in Your Congregation, ”Blessed Are the Crazy" is more than a memoir—it’s a resource for churches and other faith-based groups to provide healing and comfort. 

And book trailer. Wow:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anAW2ZqsejE

0005908_mortal_blessings_a_sacramental_farewellSecond:

I met Angela Alaimo O'Donnell at Collegeville this summer when I was there for a writing retreat. She is an elegant person and writer---I gobbled up her poetry collection, Waking My Mother, in a single sitting one morning at C'ville.

Her new book, Mortal Blessings (September 30) is sure to be wonderful.

Description:

In this lyrical adieu to her mother, renowned Catholic essayist, poet, and professor Angela O’Donnell explores how the mundane tasks of caregiving during her mother’s final days—bathing, feeding, taking her for a walk in her wheelchair—became rituals or ordinary sacraments that revealed traces of the divine.

With Joan Didion’s grasp of grief, the spiritual playfulness of Mary Karr, and the poetic agility of Kathleen Norris, Angela Alaimo O’Donnell narrates the events that followed her mother’s fall and the broken hip that led to surgery. As O’Donnell and her sisters cared for their mother’s failing body during the last days of her life, they unconsciously observed rituals that began to take on a deeper importance.

Bathing her each morning was a kind of baptism, the nightly feeding of pie took on a Eucharistic significance, trimming and polishing nails became a kind of anointing. Beyond the seven there are the myriad sacraments they made up: the sacrament of community via cell phone, the sacrament of wheelchair pilgrimage around the nursing home, and the sacrament of humor and laughter. Mortal Blessings: A Sacramental Farewell is a deeply human portrait of loss balanced by the surprising grace found in letting go; it will resonate with any spiritual reader but especially caregivers and those currently in grief.

What are you reading and/or making these days? I've been taking a break from writing lately in favor of knitting and baking muffins. Yes, I'm ready for fall.