Negotiating, Finding a Mentor, and Burning the Midnight Oil: More Thoughts on Leaning In

tumblr_m5w0ttHor91qaqasro13_400 After many months in the holds queue at the library, I finally got the e-copy of Sheryl Sandberg's Lean In on my Kindle.

I've been hearing about this book for months, and it's possible I've read more words about it than there are words in it. Some of the reaction amounts to high fives and attagirls; others criticize Sandberg's supposedly limited and naive perspective, as if centuries of patriarchy will magically evaporate if enough of us raise our hands in meetings.

I don't think that's Sandberg's thesis, and it's disingenuous to criticize a book for not being some other book. Yes, there are systemic problems that make it hard for a woman to lean in. (She addresses those, by the way.) And yes, Lean In is very socioeconomically specific. But it's still an empowering, worthwhile read.

The research about how men and woman are perceived differently in the workplace is jaw-dropping. Both sexes will downplay a person's achievements if you attach a female name to them; the same résumé with a man's name at the top will be judged more favorably. An assertive woman is seen as a bitch; an assertive man is just, well, a man. I was encouraged by the changes corporations and business schools have made to their cultures that have helped give women an even playing field to compete and thrive; those stories deserve to be heard widely. (One doctor changed his approach to rounds; instead of relying on people to raise their hands, he alternated calling on men and women, and of course found that women knew their stuff as well as or better than their male colleagues.)

Her section on negotiating for yourself was useful. Research suggests a simple two-pronged approach: be scrupulously nice in a way that builds community, and back up your negotiation with strong supporting info. (I've often said that my formula for being taken seriously as a woman in leadership is 1. being humorously self-deprecating, 2. giving people the benefit of the doubt, and 3. really, really knowing my stuff.) And I liked the story of the woman who was seeking a job and asked her, "What's your biggest problem, and how can I solve it?" Sandberg had never heard that approach to a job interview.

Her chapter on mentoring was of particular interest since that's a growing passion of mine. Sandberg writes, "We have sent the wrong message to young women. We need to stop telling them, 'Get a mentor and you will excel.' Instead, we need to tell them, 'Excel and you will get a mentor.'" Love that. She also urges women to be specific when asking for help. Asking for a lunch date to "catch up" is a bad approach; people are too busy for that, and it communicates that you haven't done your homework to know what this particular mentor might be able to provide to you (and you to her, because the best mentoring relationships are mutually beneficial). She tells a few stories of young women who received mentoring advice from more senior women but didn't consider it mentoring because they didn't meet for an hour a week. "That's not a mentor; that's a therapist," Sandberg quips.

The discrepancy in how women approach mentors makes sense in light of Deborah Tannen's classic work on how men and women communicate. Very broadly speaking, men tend to be action and task oriented; women are relationship oriented. So it makes sense that women are going to ask for an hour-a-week, catch-up-and-be-friends kind of relationship... and then be disappointed when busy executives (or senior pastors) can't fulfill that role. If we can be more specific and task-oriented when engaging a mentor, we're more likely to be successful.

I've met so many women who've lamented the lack of [female] mentors. The same story gets told again and again with different names and details: [Potential Mentor] let me down, she never called me back, she wasn't helpful at all, she saw me as a threat, etc. etc. I now wonder if part of the problem comes down to how we ask women to mentor us, and to what end.

On the complexities of leaning in when you have kids: Sandberg tells a story about one of her teams that was deadlocked on some issue. One of the men on the team spent the weekend crunching some numbers that broke the logjam on Monday. Sandberg wonders why more women don't go and do likewise. Well, if you have kids, it's probably because you're running soccer carpool, buying the birthday gift, getting a long-overdue haircut, etc. etc. (Fathers who are involved with their kids' lives will face similar challenges.) Sandberg diagnoses women's inability or unwillingness to be that "weekend warrior" as a lack of confidence, but if you're a parent, more often it's the simple chaos and unpredictability of home life. Yes, we can and should lean in. But the times we can drop everything on a moment's notice are rare. Our lives don't turn on a dime.

Did you read Lean In? What did you think?

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Image is from the Tumblr Sad White Babies with Mean Feminist Mommies, a collection of cringe-inducing stock photos that go with women-having-it-all articles.