On Being a Nerd Pastor

geeks-nerds-20100531-172647 A while back I led a retreat with some United Church of Christ pastors and asked them the icebreaker question, "What's saving your life right now?" (Thank you for that, Barbara Brown Taylor.) One of the women said, "Just a few more days until I get to go to Comic Con!"

Pastors are naturally bookish sorts--in many cases, our training involves an advanced degree, often including the study of ancient languages. But I meet a lot of pastors who are also interested in things that have been traditionally classified as nerd/geek things: comic books, cosplay, science fiction/fantasy, and so forth. I haven't quite parsed whether pastors are more nerdy overall, or my pastoral circles happen to trend that way, or whether the culture at large is becoming more embracing of nerd culture, or at least, diversifying enough that nerds can find one another.

The other day I posted to Twitter that I was thinking about writing an article about nerd pastors. Who do I need to talk to? I asked... and was flooded with responses. One person said, "@RevHez1 has been working on a theory that fandom = ekklesia." Another sent me a keynote address he'd offered to a group of pastoral counselors called "Confessions of an American Nerd." Aric Clark has his LectionARIC YouTube channel that promises to meld scripture with pop culture/"geeky" content. There's the Church of the Geek podcast. There's GeekdomHouse, which has this to say on its About page:

Our belief is that by engaging and participating in all aspects of life—physical, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual— we can strengthen and enrich communities that already exist through our love of geekery. George MacDonald, J.R.R. Tolkien, and C.S. Lewis are prime examples of people who contributed excellence to the community while allowing for things like faith, ethics, and creativity to interact with one another.

Tolkien and Lewis: serious church nerds.

From time to time, the annual gathering for NEXT Church (which I co-chaired for two years) gets called "the cool kids conference." This always makes me laugh, because in my entire life, I have never been cool.

That said, I sometimes hold off on calling myself a nerd/geek. Not because I'm too cool for that, because see above, but because nerd/geek sometimes implies a level of knowledge I don't feel I can claim. I love the Lord of the Rings movies, and have preached sermons on them, but I couldn't make it through the books. I love a good superhero blockbuster (and preached a series called "Parables and Pop Culture," which included two weeks on comic book superheroes) but I don't read comic books myself.

But is nerddom about a specific body of knowledge, or is it an orientation? Glen Weldon, a frequent panelist on Pop Culture Happy Hour and author of Superman, The Unauthorized Biography, is writing a book about nerd culture through the lens of Batman fandom. He says the basic quality of the nerd is enthusiasm--a pure joy that makes you want to delve deep into your particular area of interest. Nerds aren't posers--those people who scoff when "everyone" has discovered the obscure band, TV show or book that they loved and considered special because it was obscure and quirky. Nerds want to share the object of their enthusiasm with the world. Operating under that definition, incidentally, we need more nerd pastors in the church.

What do you think? Where do you see intersections between nerddom/geekdom, spirituality and faith?

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Image is from XKCD.