Facebook's "On This Day" as a Spiritual Practice

Screen Shot 2015-11-30 at 9.26.20 AM I don't know exactly when Facebook rolled out its On This Day feature, but it's become more and more a part of my daily social media routine. It's been (mostly) a gift to read what was important to me one, two, three or more years ago.

Reactions to On This Day are mixed. Many friends and colleagues have expressed concern that the feature can cause unnecessary pain, especially if people aren't prepared to be confronted by updates about a marriage that's now over, or about the life of a beloved person who has died. Also, Facebook updates are non-linear, haphazard even. Dismay over terrorist attacks mingle with reports on our pets. Grief visits us, but it can be nestled between Buzzfeed videos and a recipe for brussels sprouts gratin. Which is part of the beauty of the thing--profound moments mingled with the sacred ordinary. But it can also create emotional whiplash.

For people who simply don't want to go there, Facebook makes it easy to ignore On This Day. The feature can remind you every day to take a peek at what's there, but you can turn the notifications off. You can also block updates involving certain people and mute certain dates... though I suspect that's not foolproof at muting the sad stuff. I miss my dad, not just on his birthday or the day he died, but random days throughout the year.

I suspect many people use social media as a de facto journal to chronicle daily life. In that respect, it's good to have a way to go back and read... although I wish there were a way to skip easily to any date in your timeline, not just the current one. I also wish you could allow select people to view your On This Day--my husband posts rarely to Facebook but has wished he could easily access mine, especially for the posts about our family.

I believe On This Day is not just a reminder of past events. It can also be a spiritual practice, a way of "listening to your life." One of the most important practices for our family and for me is the examen, in which we talk about points of gratitude in our day. On This Day is a way of living the examen on a larger scale. Patterns emerge. Situations ripen over a series of days and months, and it can be illuminating to see a snapshot in time when we know the end of the story.

It seems to me there's a balance to be found between detachment and engagement. On This Day works best for me as a reflective practice when I've gotten into the right mental space. I might take a deep breath and spiritually prepare myself for what I'll see there, and it's mostly a delightful surprise. But if there are sad things waiting for me there, I want to be detached enough so I don't replay the heartache--I can acknowledge it and feel whatever new thing I need to feel about it.

But we don't want to be too detached either, examining our experiences as if we were a historian researching the past. Jesuit theologian Walter Burghardt talks about contemplation as a "long, loving look at the real." Loving means not holding our experiences at arms' length.

There's also something to be said for the what we might call holy amnesia. I'm struck by how many annoyances and indignities I was very exercised about at the time, that I not only don't care about any more, but don't even remember. That's such important perspective--and it also impacts what I write today. Will the future me want to read this? Will the future me even care? Those can be helpful questions to keep things in proper proportion.

Do you read On This Day? How do you engage with it?

Building a Bike Shed Out of Starbucks Cups: Beyond the #WarOnChristmas

12239653_10153584956145673_914793313154150292_n The other day I vented on Facebook,

November 8 and I'm already tired of the War on Christmas. No, not the people who are upset by Starbucks cups and Happy Holidays. The people who are upset with those people and compelled to post about it. I'm declaring war on the war on the War on Christmas.

My tongue was firmly in cheek (that last sentence! Come on!), but still, there have been a number of of blogs and FB posts, reposted and shared widely, decrying the outrage over Starbucks's red cups and companies that say "Happy Holidays." For the record, I agree with my colleagues that cries of persecution are juvenile and beside the point of Christianity. Most of them are clever, thoughtful and well written.

The problem is--and granted I am in a lefty Christian bubble too much--the reaction to the so-called War on Christmas seems way outsized to the controversy itself. Thus far the "War" seems to amount to a handful of articles, most of which mention the same 3-4 Christian leaders or groups, then sprinkle in quotes from various cranks with Twitter accounts.

I don't doubt there are people who are offended by what they see as the secularization of the Christmas season. What I question is my tribe's tendency to go straight to smackdown. Especially since this happens like clockwork every year. Must we do this?

I include myself in this question. Yeah, I didn't jump on this particular bandwagon, but I've jumped on plenty in my day, and I have the limp and the hearing loss to prove it.

The critiques of the War on Christmas (what I called the war on the War on Christmas) legitimize a perspective that frankly doesn't deserve legitimacy. (Telling your barista your name is Merry Christmas to force them to say those words? Really?!?) But more important, it amounts to building a bike shed. Which is what this post is really about.

Back in the 1950s, C. Northcote Parkinson identified the bike-shed problem, which has come to be known as Parkinson's Law of Triviality. In a nutshell:

A management committee decides to approve a nuclear power plant, which it does with little argument or deliberation.  Then comes the decision on the color of the bike shed at the plant, during which the management gets into a nit-picking debate and expends far more time and energy than on the nuclear power plant decision.

Or put another way, the amount of discussion is inversely proportional to the complexity of the topic.

Anyone who's ever served on a church council will recognize this, though it goes way beyond the church. This is the discussion about the color of the carpet in the parlor instead of why the church is dying, or the color of the corporate logo instead of the toxic office culture.

Red cups are easy. #Blacklivesmatter is complex. Westboro Church is easy. Syria is complex. We don't always have to tackle complex issues on social media. But nor should we be seduced by stuff that really, really doesn't matter. Again, I am writing to myself as much as anyone else. Please hold me to this.

Hopefully by now the red cup kerfuffle is waning. But other potential "battles" will come--it's only November 10. I'd personally like to see us not jump into critiques of the War on Christmas. Not because there's nothing to critique--there is. But because it's too easy. I also suspect there are powers out there that benefit from our outrage and our division. If nothing else, this has been free publicity for Starbucks, whose coffee and red cups I enjoy--but it's a multinational corporation that frankly doesn't need our signal boost.

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Image courtesy of my friend Meredith Kemp-Pappan. 

Shepherding the Family through Social Media

Shepherding the Family through Social Media “Mommy, can I have an Instagram account?” my daughter asked from the back seat of the van. We were on our way home from a retreat I’d led for a church in South Carolina. I’d decided to bring the family with me—the retreat was in Myrtle Beach; enough said—and they’d had a great time. The kids met all kinds of new friends and made plans to keep in touch. Apparently Instagram was the preferred method.

Unfortunately, my daughter is 11, and the Instagram terms of service specify a minimum age of 13.

What’s a rule-following mother to do? I don’t want to give her the impression that it’s OK to bend the rules, even in a trivial matter. And maybe this matter isn’t so trivial. Does an 11 year old need an Instagram account yet? I’d love to nurture these fledgling friendships, but can’t I keep her young and social-media sheltered for just a little while longer? Whom is she likely to encounter on these sites? Friends, of course, just like I happily do. But what about people who might do her harm?

I am confronted with these questions even as I work on my next book, Spirituality in the Smartphone Age, which is an attempt to examine this digital culture we all swim in. As I write, I’m trying to discern some spiritually faithful patterns and practices for engaging with technology. How much is too much? What does it mean to be “authentic” online? How can we be mindful of personal boundaries? What does meaningful community look like?

One of the challenges in writing the book is defining what I mean by spirituality, as opposed to the psychology or sociology of digital culture. Other authors have explored quite thoroughly the ways the Internet has changed the way we work, play, and relate with one another. What I’m after is something simultaneously deeper and broader: a holistic approach that integrates body, mind, spirit, and community.

But the other challenge in writing the book is that I’m so very confused and ambivalent myself about our technological age and how it is changing us.

READ THE REST at the Practicing Families website.

Photo credit: MikaelWiman via photopin cc

Our Online Habits---Survey Results

Our Online Habits As I work on my next book (working title Spirituality in the Smartphone Age), I've gotten curious about the online/social media habits of different Enneagram types, and put together a survey to that effect. (Survey is now closed.)

The Enneagram stuff won't be in the book---I'm thinking a free PDF in advance of the book---but here are some preliminary findings.

(Today's post is general and will not delve into the Enneagram at all, but if you want to learn more about what it and figure out your type, here is a place to begin.)

Disclaimers:

  • This was not a scientific study. I did not apply any statistical jiujitsu to this work, because I have none. For example, although Enneagram 6s supposedly make up half the world's population, they comprised the smallest number of respondents. That's going to skew things. Nothing to be done about that.
  • For this reason, although I will be making some guesses and drawing some conclusions, they should all be taken with a grain of salt. My guesses are based on the data I collected, nothing more. So if I report that Facebook is the most popular social media site, you should hear an unspoken "among respondents" after that claim. (Though that's a bad example because Facebook IS the most popular social media site by most metrics.)

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General Online Habits: 50% of respondents report spending 1-3 hours a day online, whether engaged in social media or reading and writing blogs or other sites. 28% spend 3-5 hours online. 15% spend more than 5 hours per day.

Reasons for Using Social Media: People could check multiple options here. The top responses by far were "my friends and family are there" and "it's entertaining/informative"; each commanding almost 70%.

"A sense of habit" was at the bottom of the list, but it was still chosen by more than a third of respondents. That seems significant to me. Habits aren't necessarily bad---brushing one's teeth twice a day would poll pretty high, eh? But I talk to more and more folks who find it hard to unplug from online activities, and who find that fact concerning.

Preferred/Favorite Social Media Sites: Upon reflection, I essentially threw these questions out as useless. Facebook and Twitter were the big winners, which seems plausible, but people were coming to the survey from those sites, so that's going to skew the result. I did note that reading and writing blogs performed very favorably---better than Twitter, actually---and Pinterest was the most beloved site among what I'd call second-tier sites such as Goodreads, Google+ or Instagram. (I know that Instagram and Tumblr are big among millenials. That's another caveat to my survey, which was advertised through my friends and friends-of-friends: I'm sure it skewed older.)

Engagement with Social Media: These questions had to do with how people use social media and other sites.

Reading v. posting: A clear majority of people felt they read and posted in a more or less balanced way. The second most popular response, with 42%, was "I mainly read and only occasionally post or comment." So the vast majority of us are actively engaging, as opposed to lurking, or posting without reading others' posts (1% each). This is a question where we saw interesting variation among the different Enneagram types. That'll be in my next post.

Content: As for what people post, a majority selected "I carefully consider what I post, thinking about how I portray myself on social media" (53%).

Only a third of respondents chose "I post what I'm thinking or feeling. I value authenticity and want my online and 'real-life' personas to be congruent." This was followed closely by "I mainly post informational stuff, such as links to news articles or political content, and not as much stuff about me personally." Only 14% of respondents reported using lists or filters to control who sees what. This is another question that had some interesting variations depending on Enneagram type.

Comments: More than half of respondents will occasionally read comments on news articles or other sites, depending on the site. But a third responded, "When/If I read the comments, I'm always sorry afterwards and feel like I need a shower." (I feel ya!)

In the comment portion of this question, people clarified their answers. For example, some folks will always read comments if it's an online community they feel a part of (e.g. RevGalBlogPals), as opposed to say, USA Today. Other comments were almost confessional in nature. One respondent said, "I often read articles, like about Michael Sam's coming out, and think 'I definitely don't want to know what the commenters are saying about this'...and then I look, because I can't stop the rubbernecking...and then I am immediately sorry." Again: I feel ya.

What We Would Change: The final question asked what we would like to change about our online/social media habits. This is really the heart of what I'm interested in, and were I to do this again, I'd focus more questions on it, but I have emails from numerous kind people who are willing to talk further.

A few people (mostly of a certain type---tune in next time) questioned why all of of the choices were phrased negatively: Social media is a positive in my life! I want more! one person commented. I had to laugh---I guess the choices reveal where I am, or where I was when I wrote the question! I get overwhelmed sometimes.

Anyway, here are the results. People could choose more than one:

51% I'm on these sites more than I should be or would like to be. I find it hard to disengage.

33% I feel like these new technologies have negatively affected my attention span.

24% I would like to do more on social media but lack time, expertise, etc.

13% Other people's postings can leave me feeling down or dissatisfied with my own life. [I find it interesting that it's so law. It's become conventional wisdom that other people's bragbooking and 'perfectly curated' personas lead to feelings of dissatisfaction. Thirteen percent isn't nothing, but this result suggests the problem isn't at all widespread.

11% I feel overwhelmed having to keep up with so many people's lives.

9% I feel burdened by the desire to present a "persona" online that doesn't always match me.

9% I get embroiled in conflict/comment wars online that I find it hard to extricate from (including emotionally).

What do you see in these results? What do you wonder about further?

In my next post, I'll share a few tidbits about each of the nine Enneagram type.

"But Can I Watch Football on the Sabbath?" With a Nod to Brene Brown's Daring Greatly

medium_3009900665 When I speak to groups about Sabbath, I almost always start at the same place:

Turn to the person next to you and tell them one thing that brings you delight. It can't be work-related (though I hope you are delighted by your work!), and ideally, it isn't something that requires costly equipment or an exotic locale. This is something you can potentially do without much effort or expense.

After folks have shared with their neighbors, I suggest that their delightful activity might be a place where they're already practicing Sabbath without calling it that.. and/or it's an entry point to think about incorporating Sabbath into their lives. Sabbath, as Isaiah reminds us in the Old Testament, is to be kept as a delight, not a chore. The creation story in Genesis has this relentless refrain: it's good, it's good, it's good. This world is good. Our bodies are good, and made for pleasure. In my own tradition, the Westminster Statement of Faith says our primary purpose is to glorify and enjoy God.

That doesn't mean that every enjoyable activity brings us closer to the Holy, I suppose. And sometimes in my retreats and discussions, people look at me skeptically when I talk about the delight stuff. Shouldn't we be doing "holy" things on that day? Isn't Sabbath about prayer and Bible reading and all those religious practices? Can we really do whatever we want?

What about watching football on TV?

I'm never quite sure how to answer. For one thing, I'm not the Sabbath police.

For another thing, while I do find prayer and Bible study to be meaningful and important activities for Christians, and lovely things to do on Sabbath, I'm more of a Barbara Brown Taylor Christian, which means I do not see a big division between sacred and secular activities.

But does that mean anything can be a Sabbath activity?

I'm reading Brené Brown's latest book, Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent and Lead, and she's helped me finally get more concrete with my answer to the football question.

[If you're not familiar with her work, the best introduction is her crazy-viral TED talk. By the way, she wants to be my big sister, doesn't she? Of course she does. She can do this, because there aren't thousands of other recovering perfectionists AND aspiring writers also clamoring to be her kid sister. No siree. Cough.]

Anyway, Brené Brown helps me answer the "football on Sabbath" question when she talks about numbing. She writes:

I believe we all numb our feelings. We may not do it compulsively or chronically, which is addiction, but that doesn't mean that we don't numb our sense of vulnerability. And numbing vulnerability is especially debilitating because it doesn't just deaden the pain of our difficult experiences; numbing vulnerability also dulls our experiences of love, joy, belonging, creativity, and empathy. We can't selectively numb emotion.

There aren't any checklists or norms to help you identify shadow comforts or other destructive numbing behavior. This requires self-examination and reflection... Are my choices comforting and nourishing my spirit, or are they temporary reprieves from vulnerability and difficult emotions that ultimately diminish my spirit?

For me, sitting down to a wonderful meal is nourishment and pleasure. Eating while I'm standing, be it in front of the refrigerator or inside the pantry, is always a red flag.Sitting down to watch one of my favorite shows on television is pleasure. Flipping through channels for an hour is numbing.

This is the key to Sabbath as well. Really, it comes down to intention. I can imagine times when watching football feels immersive and enlivening. Can such an activity also feed us spiritually? Don't know; I don't have the spectator sports gene myself. But I can see how getting caught up in a thrilling contest, in which athletes are performing to the best of their abilities and using their "fearfully and wonderfully made" bodies to their utmost, would be grounding and inspiring... and maybe even bring us closer to God. But I can imagine other times in which watching sports on TV feels mindless, when we watch out of habit or boredom, when we're not really there.

I think that's why some people see Facebook as such a source of unhappiness. In my opinion, there's nothing inherently numbing about social media. Used in an intentional and mindful way, it's a great source of fun and connection.

What makes Facebook a challenge is that, unlike a football game, there's no end to it. We can start out enjoying the relationships we cultivate there, but when we spend too much time scrolling through people, we start to numb out. I'm a big fan of technology, and as FB friends know, I'm a chatty FBer. I've also thought a lot about how to use it in a way that's good for me. So I've put all kinds of boundaries around it, whether it's using lists or only signing on a couple of times a day (and not at all on most weekends).

What do you think about this numbing stuff? Have you read Daring Greatly?

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I haven't said this recently: thank you to everyone who has read Sabbath in the Suburbs and recommended it to friends. If you haven't already, I'd be most thankful for an Amazon review.

photo credit: laverrue via photopin cc

Five Ways to Make the Most of the 30 Days of Thankfulness

medium_4785273938 It's November, the month of Thanksgiving, which means that folks on Facebook are celebrating the 30 Days of Thankfulness. Last week a friend me asked if I knew the origins of this practice. I don't know where it started, but I'm touched that she would associate it with me. The 30 days is a burst of positive energy in an often snarky and cranky social media universe...

...Generally.

However.

My friend Marci has decided not to participate because of the potential for bragbooking. I'm sympathetic to her concerns. My next book looks at technology and digital culture from a spiritual perspective.  As I research, I'm finding various studies suggesting that Facebook has the potential to decrease people's happiness. One person's gratitude is another person's braggadocio. We end up comparing other people's outsides to our insides, or as I saw it expressed somewhere, everyone else's sizzle reel to our blooper reel.

But I'm not sure the answer, for me, anyway, is to sit out the practice altogether. After all---and Marci points this out herself---gratitude is a spiritual practice.

Where's the challenge in being thankful when you're on top of the world?  It's considerably harder to see gratitude in ordinary life as it chugs along. And when things are downright crappy, gratitude can be transforming, the tiny candle you wrap your fingers around to keep the darkness at bay.

Social media is here to stay. People are welcome to dip in and out of it, or take long breaks, or hide the gratitude posts that make them crazy, or whatever they need to do for their own mental and spiritual health. As someone who takes tech sabbaths every week, I believe you're under no obligation to consume social media the way other people do. But it is a part of our lives. So it seems worthwhile to practice engaging with it in ways that are hospitable to others and gracious to yourself.

So here's how the 30-day gratitude challenge can be helpful and not an exercise in bragbooking. I offer these as someone who studies social media and digital culture, and as a pastor who has taught and practiced the Ignatian examen (a practice of gratitude and discernment) for many years.

1. Go beyond the obvious. At the women's retreat I led this weekend, I gave them an icebreaker question to answer in small groups: "It's just not Thanksgiving without..."  But I specifically told them, "You can't say 'family' or 'my grandkids.'" I hope this caveat invited them to share something more specific and personal.

My friend Kristen posted a great moment of thankfulness this weekend: "Hair - as a fresh 'do can literally change you. [My hairdresser] has been a steady presence in my life since 2004 when I wandered into the salon where she worked. 9 years, 2 salons, 4 jobs (me), 5 kids (hers plus mine) and countless haircuts, highlights and hairstyles later - I'm proud to call her friend and stylist extraordinaire."

No bragbooking there. Just a touching tribute by a fabulous, sassy gal. Kristen's update invites me into gratitude for the folks who provide services for me and the friendships that can develop.

It also makes me consider getting highlights. Again.

2. Think small. The examen is meant to be a daily practice. And often our most grateful moment is not the biggest headline of the day, but the moment that took our breath away. Maybe you got a huge raise at work (I know, in this economy? hey, it could happen), but the breathtaking moment was the act of kindness you saw in the line at Starbucks. Gratitude can be a trickster.

3. Be specific. "I'm thankful for my health" may be true. And for someone who's battled cancer, or recovered from an injury, that's huge. But consider how your update sounds to a friend whose health is a source of stress, or who's in a chronic struggle with an illness. Instead, how about a specific thing your health allowed you to enjoy today? I'm thankful that I could pick up my big kindergartner today without my back going out.

4. Violate the Zaxxon rule. At the end of every Pop Culture Happy Hour podcast, the host and guests share "what's making us happy this week." The idea is to recommend interesting movies, TV or books to the audience. During an early episode Stephen Thompson gushed about the Zaxxon video game he'd recently purchased. Later the group realized that it wasn't the best "what's making me happy," since it's not like everyone can go out and buy a Zaxxon machine. They instituted the Zaxxon rule to keep them accountable to share stuff that other people could reasonably partake of.

When it comes to gratitude, we should violate, rather than follow, the Zaxxon rule. That cuts down on comparisons. I am grateful for the flame of color from the Japanese maple in my front yard. That's very particular to my situation. You don't feel bad for not having a Japanese maple in your yard, do you?

5. Confront the bragbooker. Do it publicly only if you can do it lightheartedly, otherwise in private. Is it crazy to think we could do this, in the spirit of authenticity and friendship? Maybe. I realize this is hard. But if my posts are providing a stumbling block to someone, I want to know it. We're all works in progress, folks. We can help one another along.

Are you participating in the 30 days of gratefulness? Why or why not?

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photo credit: MTSOfan via photopin cc

Facebook Does the Wrong Thing for the Right Reason

Last week I listened to the debate on the radio show Q, "Is the Internet making us smarter or stupider?" Lots of great stuff I'm still chewing on, but one thing caught my attention. One of the panelists talked about the problem of recency, which is a bias toward the most timely information. We tend to value the most recent inputs more highly than older information, regardless of whether the new information is more important---and whether it's even correct.

There are a lot of problems with recency, but many of our social media tools and programs thrive on it.  The panelists talked a lot about how Reddit tried to identify the Boston Marathon bomber and ended up getting it wrong. One panelist suggested a system by which users can only "up-vote" a comment once an hour, to try and slow down the flurry of information that comes in faster than it can be checked.

I've been complaining for several days about Facebook's changes to its newsfeed. Rather than displaying the most recent updates, it will re-display an old status update, provided there are recent comments on it. Which means that a post from 20 hours ago shows up again, even though a) I have already seen it and b) I didn't comment or follow the post to begin with.

It occurs to me that Facebook might be trying to offset the recency effect. Perhaps they reason that a post that's still being commented on days later needs to be seen: there's still energy there;  a conversation continues to take place. Granted, the execution needs some serious tweaking---at the very least, there should be a "seen it and done with it" button---but it's a decent impulse on their part, not to automatically prioritize the most recent thing as the most noteworthy thing.

Where do you see recency at work in our digital culture, and what are its advantages and disadvantages?

Friday Link Love: Online Slacktivism, Be a Poet, and Everest Gear Then and Now

Hello friends! It's Thursday evening and I am just back from Birmingham, where I had a book event and also preached at the Presbytery of Sheppards and Lapsley. I'll post that sermon to the NEXT Church website early next week and link to it here. It was a fun trip---got to hang out with Elizabeth, one of my favorite seminary peeps and a dear friend. So I'm happy, but tired.

But... the Link Love must go on! 

Climbing Everest, Then and Now -- National Geographic

A comparison of the tools used to climb the world's tallest peak. Boots and oxygen systems, then and now.

Let's be honest: P90X or no, I'm pretty sure our forebears could take us.

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Does Online "Slacktivism" Reduce Charitable Giving? -- New Scientist

Looks like it's a hybrid effect. Click the link for a study relating to attitudes about gun control.

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Collected Wisdom of Great Writers -- Brain Pickings

Maria Popova has compiled advice from several writers she's highlighted on her blog, so it's all accessible in one place. Vonnegut, King, Allende, Sontag and more.

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Cook Dinner, Save the World -- Dinner, a Love Story

Love this quote from Michael Pollan:

To cook or not to cook thus becomes a consequential question. Though I realize that is putting the matter a bit too bluntly. Cooking means different things at different times to different people; seldom is it an all-or-nothing proposition. Yet even to cook a few more nights a week than you already do, or to devote a Sunday to make a few meals for the week, or perhaps to try every now and again to make something you only ever expected to buy — even these modest acts will constitute a kind of vote. A vote for what exactly? Well, in a world where so few of us are obliged to cook at all anymore, to choose to do so is to lodge a protest against specialization — against the total rationalization of life. Against the infiltration of commercial interests into every last cranny of our lives. To cook for the pleasure of it, devote a portion of our leisure to it, is to declare our independence from the corporations seeking to organize our every waking moment into yet another occasion for consumption. (Come to think of it, our non waking moments as well: Ambien anyone?) It is to reject the debilitation notion that, at least while we’re at home, production is work done by someone else, and the only legitimate form of leisure is consumption. This dependence marketers call “freedom.”

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Antonia Larroux -- Obituary

Not since Hugh Gallagher's infamous college essay for NYU (the laws of physics do not apply to me) have we have such an exuberant accounting of a life! This part really clinched it though:

The funeral will be led by Rev. Curt Moore of Orlando, Florida, a questionable choice for any spiritual event, but one the family felt would be appropriate due to the fact that every time Toni heard Curt preach she prayed for Jesus to return at that very moment.

On a last but serious note, the woman who loved life and taught her children to 'laugh at the days to come' is now safely in the arms of Jesus and dancing at the wedding feast of the Lamb. She will be missed as a mother, friend and grandmother. Anyone wearing black will not be admitted to the memorial. She is not dead. She is alive.

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Smart Cities: Sustainable Solutions for Urban Living -- BBC

H/t The Dish, which highlighted this piece that I found astounding:

How a group of 12-year-olds in a Calcutta slum improved their community:

Like so many slum neighborhoods, the notorious Nehru Colony doesn’t officially exist, meaning it has no access to government services such as sanitation and electricity. The youngsters set out to literally put themselves on the map. They went door to door, taking photos with their mobile phones, registering residents and detailing each child born in the colony. Information is then sent by SMS text to a database that links the data to a map hand-drawn by the kids, which is overlaid to GPS coordinates. By registering their existence on Google Maps the group has doubled the rate of polio vaccination from 40% to 80%, decreased diarrhea and malaria rates in the slum, and is lobbying for electricity.

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This Ad Has a Secret Anti-Abuse Message That Only Kids Can See -- Gizmodo

This made the rounds, and rightly so. The billboard displays a different message depending on how tall you are:

The secret behind the ad's wizardry is a lenticular top layer, which shows different images at varying angles. So when an adult—or anyone taller than four feet, five inches—looks at it they only see the image of a sad child and the message: "sometimes, child abuse is only visible to the child suffering it." But when a child looks at the ad, they see bruises on the boy's face and a different message: "if somebody hurts you, phone us and we’ll help you" alongside the foundation's phone number.

The ad is designed to empower kids, particularly if their abuser happens to be standing right next to them.

What the kids see:

anar-lenticular-02

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How Can You Become a Poet -- David Lose

Or a theologian:

Eve Mirriam, a native of Philadelphia, captures something of the beauty of not just poetry but also, I think, creativity itself.

She invites us to consider making two moves: the first is attentiveness. Trace it’s shape, pay attention to its movement, follow its life, chew and smell and see and feel all you can about that thing that fascinates you.

The second move is courage, fearlessness...

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