The Pre-Lenten Roundup

The other day I surveyed my Facebook friends to find out what people are doing to observe the season.

Besides reading this OF COURSE.

I have done a variety of things for Lent, ranging from nothing special to taking on an additional discipline, such as morning prayer or devotional reading. If you are inclined to add a spiritual discipline, may I recommend my friend Mary Allison's practice of writing a letter each day? If you're in Memphis you can even take a workshop on the topic!

I was recently drawn to this blog that describes "speed creating," in which this inventive fellow spent 30 days making an amazing new thing each day. What would it be like to have Lent be a season for tinkering? It doesn't have to be elaborate, like the thread light:

I like the idea of creating something for Lent. It speaks to me of the tradition of repentance, but in a novel way. One definition of repentance is to "go beyond the mind that you have." What could be more in keeping with that than to repurpose the things of our lives? After all, we are moving toward Easter, the ultimate story of transformation and repurposing. Death gives way to new life. An instrument of violence becomes the place where God's forgiveness is proclaimed.

But as captivated as I am by these practices, I will be giving something up instead. I am in a Meister Eckhart-ish place, who said that the spiritual life is a process of subtraction.

The truth is, I am feeling like Bilbo these days: "thin, sort of stretched, like butter, scraped over too much bread." I am feeling the need for some space, friends. So something is going to go.

I'm a little wary of Lenten fasts as nothing more than self-help couched in spiritual terms: I'm going to give up sweets so I can lose some weight! Self-improvement is a good thing, but is a new exercise regimen during Lent really devotional at heart, or is it a second chance at the New Year's resolution? (That said, I think some people take the hand-wringing a bit far.)

When I give something up, it is a reminder to breathe and pray, to experience radical contentment, and to remember that the object of my fast is not the "one thing needful," as much as I may crave it in that moment.

An example: a friend of mine is going to give up bread, so that the only bread she consumes during Lent is communion bread, what we call the bread of heaven. I'll bet you good money that she will lose weight during this time. But do you see how weight loss is not at all the focus?

I still haven't decided what I will be giving up, but it's been a topic of conversation in our house. The girls have suggested we all give up desserts. I think we're going to do this. Dessert has become a point of contention in our home---I am soooo tired of the constant needling, the negotiating, the comparing of cookie sizes. Having that whole issue off the table (pun intended) feels very spacious to me. But I'm still pondering how it connects us to Spirit.

What do you think? Those who observe Lent, what will your practice be?

One final thing. To those folks, mostly non-religious or de-churched, going around saying "I'm giving up Lent for Lent"...

Yes, I've heard that one.