Would You Work Part-Time if You Could?

Someone told me recently, "I work 10 hours a day and can barely keep up. I love what I do in my job, I just wish there were less of it." When I hear things like this I feel grateful that I am able to work part-time. I work 2/3 time and because I work evenings, weekends, and am always "on call," the mid-week hours are more flexible. So I can take my kids to the park, or get my haircut in the middle of the day and avoid the rush. I don't have to find time to squeeze in some exercise---it's built into each and every day.

Yes, it's challenging sometimes. There is a sense of "falling behind" career-wise. And as a friend and fellow PT pastor put it, "It's hard, feeling like if you just had a liiiiiiittle more time to spend, this thing you're working on could be REALLY great." I knew what she meant. And I know part-time work is not economically viable for everyone. I choose to work part-time because I like it---it allows me to live a more well-rounded life---but I'm able to work PT because my spouse doesn't. And I feel a pang of guilt when he pulls out of the driveway at 6:50 a.m. to beat the traffic to work, before the kids are even awake. (Getting them out of the house singlehandedly is no trip to the spa, mind you, but that's another post.)

I hear people talking about what we're learning from the economic downturn. Some of us hope there will be a resurgence in old-fashioned stuff like saving and living within one's means. One thing I'm hearing again and again is that many of the jobs that are gone are not coming back. High unemployment could be with us for years. What are we going to do about it?

I'm wading into territory I know little about, but I've wondered whether we'll see the rise of part-time work, and whether we can find ways to make that a healthy change and not just a "best we can do"  thing. There's nothing sacred and eternal about the forty-hour work week. It became the national standard only in the 1930s, though its roots are much older. It was meant to protect workers from being forced to work too much, not to force them to work "enough." Futurists in the last century predicted that labor-saving devices would allow us to work less and have much more leisure time, yet that doesn't seem to be the case. We work more than the citizens of any other industrialized country and take much less vacation.

Could more part-time work be part of the answer? Churches all over the place are downshifting full-time staff positions to part-time ones, often with a great sense of shame. Of course these are people's jobs we're talking about. But I know folks who would work PT if they could---if they could work out the personal budgetary issues and if their workplace would let them. The person I quoted above would never dream of asking to work part-time because it would be seen as a lack of loyalty, or that the individual "can't cut it." If PT workers become more of a norm, maybe that reluctance would change.

Of course one of the major barriers is economic---would people make enough to live on? (That's where the simplicity/saving stuff comes into play.) And we'd either have to make PT employees eligible for health insurance, or de-couple healthcare from employment (I favor the latter, but that too is another post.)

If the jobs really aren't coming back... what will we do?

Would you work part-time if you could? And are there other barriers besides economics that stop you from doing so?